escape room

 

ABSINTHE COCKTAILS STRAIGHT FROM THE PROHIBITION.
WHEN THE RED LIGHT IS ON THE SPEAKEASY IS OPEN.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Gypsy Guitars Duo

June 16th @ 7pm

Get your early evening groove with Gypsy Jazz!
Prohibition era attire is welcome!!!
$5 suggested donation to the band.
Password is: ***Madhatter***

Bardic Alchemy

June 23rd @ 7pm

Bardic Alchemy is a brand new element in the Celtic Rock world. This trio, based in the mountains of Asheville, North Carolina is comprised of multi-instrumentalist Connell Sanderson, guitarist Nick Marcone and percussionist and vocalist Tyler Watts.
Bardic Alchemy is best described as a psychedelic trip into a musical world that is heavily inspired by the Celtic musical traditions…run through various effects pedals. Everything from soothing, mellefluously reverberating whistle melodies supported by groovy guitar lines and thumping djembe beats to high energy dance tunes on the Scottish and Irish pipes to three part vocal harmonies and even improvised pieces, Bardic Alchemy is a surprisingly dynamic and unpredictable musical journey.
$5 cover

The Absinthe Speakeasy is a one-of-a-kind creation bringing steampunk,  prohibition cocktails, games, and good people together for unforgettable events and experiences.

We speak easy Thursday from 5-9pm, Friday from 5-10:30pm, Saturday 1-10:30 and Sunday 1-8pm.  Do you know the password?

It wasn’t until the 1990’s that absinthe resurfaced out of rumor and speculation. Wormwood, one of the root ingredients of absinthe, was found to have curative properties known to French soldiers as far back as the 1840’s, as scientists found proof that wormwood is an effective suppressant of malaria. Absinthe was once again on the cultural map, and opportunistic distillers looked for loopholes in order to produce and distribute the drink once again. The largest loophole existed in the law of the United Kingdom, where absinthe was never all that popular, and as such, never banned. Imports and sale of absinthe increased steadily through the 1990’s, but the brands being sold –Bohemian, or Czech branded absinthe – were considered to be a lesser product to the original Swiss and French recipes.

The early 2000s saw the repeal of absinthe bans around the world, just a century after the bans were put in place, and a little over two centuries after the modern recipe was popularized. In 2005, Switzerland repealed its ban, once again making absinthe legal in its country of origin, and as of 2007, at least two brands of absinthe were being legally bought and sold in the United States.

Source: http://www.absinthe101.com

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